Thursday, April 26, 2012

How to spot a scam job



I have recently returned from a job interview from “Infusion Enterprises” or “Claims World Wide” (Infusion enterprises was on the job posting, Claims worldwide was on the brochure.) Before I went for the interview I figured I would check “infusion enterprises” out . Infusion enterprises had two websites which were not finished. links to information abut the manager showed a blank page, hourly salary changed from each posting. (18.00 on craigslist, 15.00 on drexels site and 17.00 on there official web page) their word press had one picture with no information other than “march madness”?, and still no information of who runs the place. I decided to try facebook, they had a group of photos all from the same meeting. I couldn’t find any information on them or the sponsor they claim to work with. So I assumed sine there facebok page had just been made that they were a start up. The building the office was in looked nice, from the outside. You could believe that a business would be in there. They had me sold until saw the office. When ever you enter an office, take a look around. Real offices have phones desks, space for people to move around. The way things are set up should be whats best for working. Or at the bare minimal an office phone. The office looked like it was falling apart. Chairs stack against the wall,exposed wires coming from the floor, tables placed on the outside of the room. (If the business wont even put money into their office. What makes you think they would put money in your pocket?) The truth is the only thin they offer is training to learn from them and get certified to certify others. It is the modern day pyramid scheme. (Someone brings you in, you bring more people in, they bring people in and so forth.) You will always pay up to the person above you, if you want a raise or a promotion then you have to bring in more people. If you wanted you could pay them to train you but after that your on your own. They do not provide customers. What they do is provide training. (They might tell you about the many conventions that you can go to for networking clients. But those cost money as well.) If your look for a job and not one another scam then here are 10 ways to spot the fakes.

Their slogans involves you getting paid

A high hourly wage with no experience required

Offers rapid promotions

Their office is full of randomly placed office supplies

If “only a selected few will be asked to stay for orientation”

If the person setting the appointments is also one of the manager.

If it is a group interview but there is no group.

If they hand you a clip board with an application that says marketing representative

If they ever ask who owns your home

If the posting is too good to be true

If your ever on the ropes and your looking for a job Infusion enterprises aka Claims world wide, is not your answer. The only thing they will provide is training.  And if anyone comments about Infusion enterprises not being a scam its because they work there. 

42 comments:

  1. Thanks for this post. I was actually thinking about checking this place out through a craigslist ad. Saved me a lot of hassle, Much appreciated!

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    1. Thank You, for the clarification, I recently went one of these meetings, it felt not at all legitimate and I personally felt like an idiot for even being there. It was textbook placement of their material, a board full of weekly "success stories" on colored prints, a "fun carefree" enviroment. The 'manager' was even clever enough to put a rejected application highlighted in big red sharpie "rejected" to make your acceptance feel special. I appreciate the reassurance that this is a joke, i didn't know who to turn to because I was too embarrassed to tell anyone that I fell for even showing up to one of these meetings. What I am concerned about is possibly they might be misusing my information for their malicious doings. I don't remember if on the application I put down my social security.

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    2. I believe that they just want you to pay for their "special training." But whenever you hand out your social security number still its good to be cautious just in case.

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    3. Totally false. Bob, you can't write that a company wants you to pay for training, when they don't. This is slander. Take it down.

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    4. Hey thanks for saving me the hassel of going on this interview. I really felt fishy after getting off the phone with the "district manager". I've decided I'm not going on the interview. Much appreciated

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    5. I went to this too! Such a scam and he won't stop calling me! I wasted all of my gas and time. All he did was talk about himself and related every topic to himself in some way. I was there for 8 hours of "training", didn't get an actual break (had to eat while he taught). Very uncomfortable environment to be in.

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  2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  3. Bob, get a girlfriendJune 9, 2012 at 12:01 PM

    This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  4. Bob, which office did you go to for this interview? I know they have several(I actually just went in for an interview at their Warminster Headquaters) and had a totally different experience. Also, why are some of these comments removed? Kind of makes YOU seem a little scammy

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    1. Sounds to me like you are the scammy one. You are probably involved in this scam. People like you need to stop trying to scam people out of their hard earned money. Jobs are so hard to come by now and fake companies wasting people time is just evil.

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  5. In order to be paid by any company, they have to have your social security number, are you dumb?

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  6. You work for infusion enterprises and you act like my 10 year old son. It shows alot about your company when a small blog post creates such outrage. The truth will always incite the worst reaction. Please stop leaving your childish comments on my post.

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  7. Just went for an interview with this company. They seemed like good people. I guess the work is tough, but any job that pays well is tough. I guess I should have expected that when I saw $18.00. No company is going to pay you $18.00/hr to do paperwork and sit behind a computer screen (which I would hate). It's great that they pay you more for good performance, too. I think everything seemed fair here. Most people who look at these opportunities as scams are people who will always need to work underneath someone else and be told what to do. You definitely need confidence and a backbone for this job. Where there is great risk, there is great reward. Where there is no risk, there are fat, depressed people sitting in cubicles from 9-5, making just enough money to stress over bills, and hate their lives.

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    1. Please grow the hell up. Fat people? Seriously? You don't make $18.00 an hour. Who are you kidding? The only people you are getting in there are desperate people who have no job skills and are looking for easy money but are not going to find it here.

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  8. I saw some other people who didn't get the job who seemed pretty mad, too. Don't take it personally, Bob. You find a job yet?

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  9. I'm not sure why you had removed my previous comment. It was probably because it made you look like an ass because you had no idea what you were talking about.

    This business is not a "pyramid scheme" (or multi-level-marketing as it's properly known). There is no "certification" required. Anyone who was awake for more than 20 minutes at the interview would recognize that there is no such requirement.

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    1. Don't you have anything better to do then spam my blog?

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    2. One could ask you the same thing. Don't you have anything better to do than to libel a company you've never worked for?

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    3. Libel is only true if the comments are false. If they are not false then you should be getting a lawyer to take this blog down. However you would have to prove your company is not a pyramid scheme. That is why this blog is still here.

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  10. Anonymous-May20th,
    Hopefully you were smart enough to not put your social security number on an application. That should be an immediate red flag.

    The other Anonymous is correct when someone is working for an employer they do need the person's tax identification number (SSN), but all employers will have the person fill out their SSN and tax withholding information after they've been hired.

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    1. I went for an interview and they don't ask for a SSN on the application (I don't think any company does that) but after you're signed up - all companies need your SSN in order to pay you legally.

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  11. I actually went to one of their group interviews and the follow-up. First off, they are misleading in their ad. You get $18 per appointment you set up, and of course they don't provide you with clients. You have to go around to your family and friends to sell this legal service. The two managers seemed extremely off as well; just seemed like salesmen trying to sell me a job. Like the above poster, I also noticed the pile of rejected apps on the managers desk. You're advertising on CRAIGSLIST for god's sake, I know that you'll take anybody. How stupid do you think I am? I was looking into doing this for just the summer but there's no way I can get into something like this, seemed like a waste of time and I don't trust referring friends to do business with these people. Tried to do some research, and I couldn't find ANYTHING (reviews, experiences, etc.) about anybody who have used Infusion Enterprises or Claims Worldwide's services. So if you give me this big presentation about how much people love the service and how most people who view the presentation use them, how come there is NOTHING out there about your customers? Did a search of the CEO on LinkedIn, hahahaha... former manager at Vector, one of the most notorious MLM scams.

    Shady as all hell. Stay away. Hope this prevents someone from wasting their time.

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    1. Thanks for the "heads up"! I also "interviewed" with Vector some years ago. Helps to get the skinny without wasting valuable time.

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  12. I hate people like this, they should be punsihed for preying on those who are eagerly searching for jobs...

    thanks for posting this because those A-holes in glass door took out all of our complaints.

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  13. WOW, they deleted our interviews, i re-posted mine reworked to be PC but still a stern warning for newcomers. They watch glassdoor really closely because on of their dolt managers commented and started to slander me...

    beyond that they have a bunch of reviews and interview reviews posted on the same day or week.

    So I guess these guys are too stupid to understand the streisand effect, its funny because I was casually commenting before, now I posted my review on every website I could, I also contacted glass-door and informed them of potential fraud and censorship.

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  14. I went to one of their "interviews" and they asked me to leave since I asked too many questions about their pyramid scheme and sham "insurance" company.

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    1. Good job, that is awsome to hear that asking to many questions made them nervous and you were asked to leave

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  15. I was offered a job and this company but I quit after I realized I have to bring them clients! They were very misleading with the ad on craigslist and during the orientation...Who in the hell knows a lot of people with insurance claims?!?! Come on!! I would not really recommend this job to anyone unless they know a bunch of people with insurance claims...

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  16. I responded to the craigslist ad offering $17p/h. I went to the interview and was offered the job. I started the 3 day training the next day. From day one i was concerned about their compensation plan. But i decided to do the training and see what happens. Basically they pay you $17 p/sales attempt and you make $75 p/claims(1-5) $100 p/claims(6-10) $125 p/claims(11-15) and $150 p/claim after that. The one guy did say that if you had a catastrophic loss claim or a really big claim that the owner might pay you as if it were 5 claims. My point is simple when a claim is adjusted the only way to make the pay fair is to take a percentage. Their average claim according to them is $10,000 and the fee charged to the client is 33.3%. So if you bring in a $10,000 claim $3,300 is subtracted from the clients settlement. So your claim produced $3,300 in profit. The only way to make this fair is for you to get a percentage of the profit. It's just not right that they dont pay you a percentage. They want you to bring them the business and not let you make the money you deserve. They basically are a middle man. They take the business that you bring in and bring it to a company that can adjust your claim. The funny thing is that if they paid you a fair percentage for the business that you bring them and were completley transparent and honest about everything they would probably have a really great business. Dont sell yourselves short for so little!
    $10,000=$3,300
    $15,000=$4,995
    $20,000=$6,660
    ETC.
    The money that they make goes up and yours doesn't
    When i asked them about this he told me that he didnt think that my heart was in this and that he didnt think i should stay for their Advanced Training. What that really means is he didnt want me to blow up there spot and start asking questions infront of everyone. If you guys just give people what they deserve it would work out alot better for you I think.

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    1. I think they're average claim is $10k, so that means even when the claim is $4,000 you still make the same amount instead of less. Seems pretty fair to me and pretty ignorant to only look at the negative side.

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    2. LOL these people just define how shady they are. They totally lied to us and burned us. Believe you me they are total sharks just chumming the waters,

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  17. Amazing, I fell for the Vector Marketing scam as a college student years ago, and the same shyster who ran the Vector office is the founder of this racket! What a parasite.

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  18. Everybody on here is probably still unemployed.

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  19. Hey Bob, this post has been dead for months and I'm not sure if you still are on your blog anymore but I have a couple questions for you pertaining to this posting. Is it too much to ask for you to shoot me an email? twittersynn@yahoo.com, thanks!

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  20. Hey Bob, this post has been dead for months and I'm not sure if you still are on your blog anymore but I have a couple questions for you pertaining to this posting. Is it too much to ask for you to shoot me an email? twittersynn@yahoo.com, thanks!

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  21. Bob you should definitely leave the immature and totally unprofessional comments that are obviously left by this illigetimate company. It totally portrays their character for what they are. Good for you for showing exactly what they are.

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  22. claims worldwide is also a scam, they lure people in with sending out these "adjusters" to inflate the property damage quote, they send out all inside people, contractors, adjusters and then they refer you to an attorney when of course the insurance company denies the totally inflated ridiculous estimate. They sell you that they will sue and get you this incredible amount. what they leave out is that they all work for the same owner under several different business names. After the adjusters tell you you totally can get this inflated amount, they have a contractor come out and back them up, then an attorney that they know to sue for what you deserve...what they leave out is that they are all in it together. Once you figure it out after 2 years of suing, and you just want to fix your house now you are in to them for thousands of legal fees. So now you cant afford to make them go away, after years of delays with 8 million b.s. excuses they settle for not even what you would have legitimately gotten through the insurance company's adjuster and they tell you you are lucky to settle. If not you go to court and a judge tells you you get virtually nothing. Either way they walk away with thousands and you get next to nothing. The entire set up is a scam from start to finish. RUN, and just get legitimate contractor to give you a bid and submit it to the insurance adjuster is your best bet.

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